Creative Writing Weekly Updates: 9.14-9.18

Monday: Critical Feedback v. Criticism

UNIT GOAL: Students will write a piece of Creative Nonfiction.

Objective: Students will learn Lerman Method for Critical Feedback and apply it to evaluate peer’s work.

Handouts: Lerman Method for Critical Feedback

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Tuesday: The Zen of Writing

UNIT GOAL: Students will write a piece of Creative Nonfiction. 

Objective: Students will read and respond to the Preface of Ray Brandbury’s The Zen of Writing, and will revise “Choose Your Own Adventure” using peer feedback.

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Wednesday: I don’t know why I remember

UNIT GOAL: Students will write a piece of Creative Nonfiction.

Objective: By responding to “I don’t know why I remember” prompt student will be able to pinpoint previously unexplored material that remains charged in some important emotional way as material for Creative Nonfiction piece.

Handouts: Student Sample, Mentor Text from from East of Eden

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Thursday: I am a camera

Objective: After reading Christopher Isherwood’s “Goodbye Berlin” students will notice and render vivid details to describe a scene without trying to explain or interpret it as material for Creative Nonfiction piece.

Handouts: Mentor Text from “Goodbye Berlin” by Christopher Isherwood, Student Sample

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Friday: Writing Workshop

 

 

English 3P Honors: Weekly Updates for 9.14-9.18

Monday: What is America & American Identity?

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

ObjectiveStudents will discuss and define concept of AMERICA and AMERICAN IDENTITY by participating in concept attainment activity and FOUR SQUARE discussion.  

Handouts: INTERACTIVE NOTEBOOK RUBRIC, Introduction to Encounters and Foundations

HOMEWORK: One Pager For Summer Reading DUE FRIDAY

Tuesday & Wednesday: Historical Context of Early American Literature & Culture

Objective: After participating in a GALLERY WALK, students will be able to explain the effects of European settlements on native populations and compare Rationalist and Puritan views of human nature, God, and government by completing a Gallery Walk Pamphlet.

a. Gallery Walk Images and Text

b. Gallery Walk Pamphlet

c. Web Resource: http://www.ushistory.org/us/index.asp

HOMEWORK: Hobbes and Rousseau on Human NatureOne Pager For Summer Reading DUE FRIDAY,

Philosophy-Header1

Thursday : Human Nature Socratic Seminar Preparation

Due: Annotations and Questions for Hobbes and Rousseau

Objective: After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature”  to those expressed by John Steinbeck’s East of Eden in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

c. Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep, and Socratic Seminar Outer Circle

Friday: Human Nature Socratic Seminar

HOMEWORK: One Pager For Summer Reading DUE FRIDAY

After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

c. Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep, and Socratic Seminar Outer Circle

English 3P Weekly Updates: 9.14-18

Art-Painting-American-Flag-Wallpaper-HDMonday: What is America & American Identity?

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

ObjectiveStudents will discuss and define concept of AMERICA and AMERICAN IDENTITY by participating in concept attainment activity and FOUR SQUARE discussion.  

Handouts: INTERACTIVE NOTEBOOK RUBRIC, Introduction to Encounters and Foundations

Tuesday: Historical Context of Early American Literature & Culture

After participating in a GALLERY WALK, students will be able to explain the effects of European settlements on native populations and compare Rationalist and Puritan views of human nature, God, and government by completing a Gallery Walk Pamphlet.

a. Gallery Walk Images and Text

b. Gallery Walk Pamphlet

c. Web Resource: http://www.ushistory.org/us/index.asp

Philosophy-Header1Wednesday: Introduction to Human Nature

After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

a. from Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes

b. from Discourse on Inequality by Jean Jacques Rousseau

Thursday : Human Nature Socratic Seminar Preparation

After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

c. Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep, and Socratic Seminar Outer Circle

Friday: Human Nature Socratic Seminar

After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

c. Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep, and Socratic Seminar Outer Circle