Building a Democracy

becoming-a-democracy-1

“A nation is formed by the willingness of each of us to share the responsibility for upholding the common good.” — Barbara Jordan

Unit Goal:

Students will analyze various texts to determine how foundational documents use rhetorical devices to state the case for unity and/ or protecting individual rights.

Essential Question:

HOW DO WE CREATE A UNIFIED NATION WHILE PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF EVERYONE? (Click for Infographic Summary of the Unit)

Literary Terms:

Purpose, Diction, Tone, Central Claim, rhetoric, rhetorical features, rhetorical devices, syntax, parallelism, premise, ethos, pathos, logos, counterclaim/counterargument,

Academic Terms:

TOOLS: Vocabulary Bank, Tone Words

Objective I:  Identify and analyze CENTRAL IDEAS and Rhetorical Devices in EARLY AMERICAN PUBLIC DOCUMENTS.

I. Pre-reading:

a. Barbara Jordan Quote Analysis

b. “A New American Nation” p. 109-110 & “Democracy 4 Square Discussion

c.  Videos: “The Presidents: Jefferson Writes the Declaration of Independence” & Schoolhouse Rocks: Fireworks

II. Close Read and Compare ideas of government in “Declaration of Independence” and “The Constitution”

III: Post Reading: Compare and Contrast Summary & Says Means Matters

Objective 3: After participating in Learning Stations, students will be able to compare  views of government depicted by foundational public documents in a formal presentation.

I.  Pre-reading: Image Quick Analysis: Join or Die

II. Reading: Learning Stations

III.  Post-Reading: Presentation

Objective 4: Analyze the contributions of slave narratives to the tradition of democratic discourse in the United States.  

I.  Pre-reading: Image Quick Analysis

II. Reading: “The Autobiography of Olaudah Equiano,” by Olaudah Equiano (AKA Gustavus Vassa)

III.  Post-Reading: “Did fear of Slave Revolts Drive American Independence” Socratic Seminar Evaluation Guide