Mexican American Literature and Culture: Weekly Update 9.29-10.3

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportunity to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE…otherwise known as maybe, perhaps, we will see.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

Monday 9.29: Intro to Perspectives of the Conquest Progress Check

UNIT GOAL: After investigating and analyzing perspectives of Early American encounters through texts which include Spanish account, Aztec poetry, 20th Century art and poetry, students will write an expository essay which evaluates the impact of European arrival to the continent on Native populations and compares perspectives of encounters between native populations and Europeans.

Objective: After completing notes on IMAGERY in Diego Rivera’s La Gran Tenochtitlan, students will be able to write an Analytical Summary

Handouts: La Gran Tenochtitlan,Analytical Summary

Homework: N/A

Tuesday 9.30: Perspectives of the Conquest

UNIT GOAL: After investigating and analyzing perspectives of Early American encounters through texts which include Spanish account, Aztec poetry, 20th Century art and poetry, students will write an expository essay which evaluates the impact of European arrival to the continent on Native populations and compares perspectives of encounters between native populations and Europeans.

Objective: After participating in Learning Stations, students will be able to compare perspectives of the conquest depicted by IMAGERY by completing Dialectical Journal

Handouts: Dialectical Journal

Homework: N/A

Wednesday 10.1: Perspectives of the Conquest

UNIT GOAL: After investigating and analyzing perspectives of Early American encounters through texts which include Spanish account, Aztec poetry, 20th Century art and poetry, students will write an expository essay which evaluates the impact of European arrival to the continent on Native populations and compares perspectives of encounters between native populations and Europeans.

Objective: After participating in Learning Stations, students will be able to compare perspectives of the conquest depicted by IMAGERY by completing Dialectical Journal

Handouts: Dialectical Journal

Homework: N/A

Thursday 10.2: Perspectives of the Conquest

UNIT GOAL: After investigating and analyzing perspectives of Early American encounters through texts which include Spanish account, Aztec poetry, 20th Century art and poetry, students will write an expository essay which evaluates the impact of European arrival to the continent on Native populations and compares perspectives of encounters between native populations and Europeans.

Objective: After participating in Learning Stations, students will be able to compare perspectives of the conquest depicted by IMAGERY by completing Dialectical Journal

Handouts: Dialectical Journal

Homework: N/A

Friday 10.3: Perspectives of the Conquest

UNIT GOAL: After investigating and analyzing perspectives of Early American encounters through texts which include Spanish account, Aztec poetry, 20th Century art and poetry, students will write an expository essay which evaluates the impact of European arrival to the continent on Native populations and compares perspectives of encounters between native populations and Europeans.

Objective: After participating in Learning Stations, students will be able to compare perspectives of the conquest depicted by IMAGERY by completing Dialectical Journal

Handouts: Dialectical Journal

Homework: N/A

English 3P Honors: Weekly Update 9.29-10.3

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportunity to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes, what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE means maybe, if time allows, perhaps.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

 

Monday 9.29: Introduction to First Literatures Progress Check

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to compare archetypes and native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: a. PREREADING: Native Voices Video b. READING: from “Coyote Finishes His Work” p. 25 & The Big Myth c. POST READING: Summary Template

Homework: N/A

Tuesday 9.30: Introduction to Puritan Writing

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: Puritan Writing: SWBAT compare how Anne Bradstreet and Jonathan Edwards used figurative language and imagery to reveal their ideas about HUMAN NATURE.

Handouts: PRE-READING: Anticipation Guide,Edwards Notes & Tone Words

Homework: Read Anne Bradstreet, “Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666″ pp. 28-29

Wednesday 10.1: Jonathan Edwards

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: Puritan Writing: SWBAT compare how Anne Bradstreet and Jonathan Edwards used figurative language and imagery to reveal their ideas about HUMAN NATURE.

Handouts: “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards, pp. 44-49, Dialectical Journal

Homework: The Crucible Act 2 Dialectical Journal, Anne Bradstreet, “Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666″ pp. 28-29 write a SUMMARY & COMPLETE DIALECTICAL JOURNAL

Thursday 10.2: Jonathan Edwards

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: Puritan Writing: SWBAT compare how Anne Bradstreet and Jonathan Edwards used figurative language and imagery to reveal their ideas about HUMAN NATURE.

Handouts: “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards, pp. 44-49, Dialectical Journal

Homework: The Crucible Act 2 Dialectical Journal, Read The Crucible & Anne Bradstreet, “Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666″ pp. 28-29 write a SUMMARY & COMPLETE DIALECTICAL JOURNAL

Friday 10.3: Puritan Writing Progress Check

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: Puritan Writing: SWBAT compare how Anne Bradstreet and Jonathan Edwards used figurative language and imagery to reveal their ideas about HUMAN NATURE.

Handouts: “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards, pp. 44-49, Dialectical Journal

Homework: The Crucible Act 2 Dialectical Journal, Read The Crucible & Anne Bradstreet, “Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666″ pp. 28-29 write a SUMMARY & COMPLETE DIALECTICAL JOURNAL

 

English 3P: Weekly Update 9.29-10.3

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportunity to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes, what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE means maybe, if time allows, perhaps.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

Monday 9.28: Human Nature & Native American Oral Narratives

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: Native Voices Video,The Sun Still Risesby Joseph Bruchac, Coyote Finishes His Work Notes p. 25, Coyote Finishes Dialectical Journal

Homework: Read and Annotate “The Sky Tree” A Huron Narrative

Tuesday 9.29: Human Nature & Native American Oral Narratives

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: Native Voices Video,The Sun Still Risesby Joseph Bruchac, Coyote Finishes His Work Notes p. 25, Coyote Finishes Dialectical Journal

Homework: Read and Annotate “The Sky Tree” A Huron Narrative

Wednesday 10.1: Introduction to First Literatures Progress Check

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: a. PREREADING: Native Voices Video b. READING: from “Coyote Finishes His Work” p. 25 & The Big Myth c. POST READING: Summary Template

Homework: N/A

Thursday 10.2: Introduction to Puritan Writing

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: SWBAT identify how Jonathan Edwards used figurative language and imagery to reveal his ideas about HUMAN NATURE.

Handouts: PRE-READING: Anticipation Guide,Edwards Notes & Tone Words

Homework: N/A

Friday 10.3: Jonathan Edwards

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: SWBAT identify how Jonathan Edwards used figurative language and imagery to reveal his ideas about HUMAN NATURE.

Handouts: PRE-READING: Anticipation Guide,Edwards Notes & Tone Words

Homework: N/A

 

Mexican American Literature & Culture: Weekly Update 9.22-9.26

PERIOD 2

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportunity to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE…otherwise known as maybe, perhaps, we will see.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

 

Monday 9.22: SOCRATIC SEMINAR

UNIT GOAL: Define identity terms as they apply to Mexican American literature and evaluate basic issues and themes.

Objective: After annotating Noah Remnick’s article “Why Ethnic Studies is Good for California, and America?” students will be able to practice academic behaviors to discuss the value of Ethnic Studies in a Socratic Seminar.

Handouts: Socratic Seminar Evaluation Guide, Questioning Guide

Homework: N/A

Tuesday 9.23: Why Ethnic Studies?

UNIT GOAL: Define identity terms as they apply to Mexican American literature and evaluate basic issues and themes.

Objective(s): After participating in SOCRATIC SEMINAR, students will be able to write a paragraphs that evaluates the importance of each term to the study of cultural identity.

Handouts: Socratic Seminar Guide, Class Survey

Homework: N/A

Wednesday 9.24: Intro to Perspectives on the Conquest

UNIT GOAL: After investigating and analyzing perspectives of Early American encounters through texts which include Spanish account, Aztec poetry, 20th Century art and poetry, students will write an expository essay which evaluates the impact of European arrival to the continent on Native populations and compares perspectives of encounters between native populations and Europeans.

Objective: After completing notes on IMAGERY in Diego Rivera’s La Gran Tenochtitlan, students will be able to write an Analytical Summary

Handouts: La Gran Tenochtitlan,Analytical Summary

Homework: N/A

Thursday 9.25: Perspectives in the Conquest

UNIT GOAL: After investigating and analyzing perspectives of Early American encounters through texts which include Spanish account, Aztec poetry, 20th Century art and poetry, students will write an expository essay which evaluates the impact of European arrival to the continent on Native populations and compares perspectives of encounters between native populations and Europeans.

Objective: After participating in Learning Stations, students will be able to compare perspectives of the conquest depicted by IMAGERY by completing Dialectical Journal

Handouts: Dialectical Journal

Homework: N/A

Friday 9.26: Perspectives in the Conquest

UNIT GOAL: After investigating and analyzing perspectives of Early American encounters through texts which include Spanish account, Aztec poetry, 20th Century art and poetry, students will write an expository essay which evaluates the impact of European arrival to the continent on Native populations and compares perspectives of encounters between native populations and Europeans.

Objective: After participating in Learning Stations, students will be able to compare perspectives of the conquest depicted by IMAGERY by completing Dialectical Journal

Handouts: Dialectical Journal

Homework: N/A

 

English 3P Honors: Weekly Update 9.22-9.26

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportunity to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes, what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE means maybe, if time allows, perhaps.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

Monday 9.22: Human Nature & Native American Oral Narratives

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: Native Voices Video,The Sun Still Risesby Joseph Bruchac, The Sun Still Rises Annotation Guide

Homework: N/A

Tuesday 9.23: Human Nature & Native American Oral Narratives

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing DIALECTICAL JOURNALS and Summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts/ Reading: “The Sky Tree” a Huron narrative, “Coyote Finishes his Work” a Nez Perce Story, pp. 21-24 Dialectical Journal

Homework: N/A

Wednesday 9.24: Introduction to First Literatures Progress Check

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: a. PREREADING: Native Voices Video b. READING: from “Coyote Finishes His Work” p. 25 & The Big Myth c. POST READING: Summary Template

Homework: N/A

Thursday 9.25: Introduction to Puritan Writing

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: Puritan Writing: SWBAT compare how Anne Bradstreet and Jonathan Edwards used figurative language and imagery to reveal their ideas about HUMAN NATURE.

Handouts: PRE-READING: Anticipation Guide,Edwards Notes & Tone Words

Homework: Read Anne Bradstreet, “Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666” pp. 28-29

Friday 9.26: Jonathan Edwards

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: Puritan Writing: SWBAT compare how Anne Bradstreet and Jonathan Edwards used figurative language and imagery to reveal their ideas about HUMAN NATURE.

Handouts: “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards, pp. 44-49, Dialectical Journal

Homework: Read Anne Bradstreet, “Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666” pp. 28-29 write a SUMMARY & COMPLETE DIALECTICAL JOURNAL

English 3P: Weekly Update 9.22-9.26

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportunity to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes, what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE means maybe, if time allows, perhaps.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

Monday 9.22: SOCRATIC SEMINAR Progress Check

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Handouts: a. from Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes b. from Discourse on Inequality by Jean Jacques Rousseau d. Questioning Guide e. Socratic Seminar Evaluation Guide

Tuesday 9.23: SOCRATIC SEMINAR Assessment & GOOGLE CLASS Set Up

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: Students will self assess objective mastery by completing SOCRATIC SEMINAR FINAL THOUGHTS.

Handouts: N/A

Homework: N/A

Wednesday 9.24: Human Nature & Native American Oral Narratives

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: Native Voices Video,The Sun Still Risesby Joseph Bruchac, The Sun Still Rises Annotation Guide

Homework: N/A

Thursday 9.25: Human Nature & Native American Oral Narratives

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing DIALECTICAL JOURNALS and Summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts/ Reading: “The Sky Tree” a Huron narrative, “Coyote Finishes his Work” a Nez Perce Story, pp. 21-24 Dialectical Journal

Homework: N/A

Friday 9.26: Introduction to First Literatures Progress Check

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: a. PREREADING: Native Voices Video b. READING: from “Coyote Finishes His Work” p. 25 & The Big Myth c. POST READING: Summary Template

Homework: N/A

Mexican American Literature and Culture: 2014 Scholars at School Lecture Series launches Friday

Dr. Paul Apodaca is a professor of Anthropology and Sociology at Chapman University
Paul Apodaca (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles) is an Associate Professor of Sociology and American Studies.  Dr. Apodaca specializes in Folkore, Mythology, American Indian studies and California, Southwestern and Mexican culture.  He is the former Editor of the Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology. His research has helped to preserve and continue American Indian music in California. A founding consultant for the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian, Dr. Apodaca was part of a team winning the Academy Award in 1985 for the feature documentary “Broken Rainbow.” Dr. Apodaca was curator of the Folk Art, American Indian, California and Orange County history collections of the Bowers Museum for 17 years.

Mexican American Literature & Culture Weekly Update: 9.15-9.19

PERIOD 2

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportunity to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE…otherwise known as maybe, perhaps, we will see.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

 

Monday 9.15: Themes and Issues in Mexican American Literature 

UNIT GOAL: Define identity terms as they apply to Mexican American literature and evaluate basic issues and themes.

Objective(s): After completing CORNELL NOTES on video, “Exploring the Borderlands,” students will be able to write a summary that identifies significant historical contexts and themes of Mexican American Literature.

HandoutsCornell Notes Guide and Instructions“Exploring the Borderlands”Analytical Summary

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

 

Tuesday 9.16: Assimilation, Acculturation, & Resistance

UNIT GOAL: Define identity terms as they apply to Mexican American literature and evaluate basic issues and themes.

Objective(s): After participating in and PHILOSOPHICAL CHAIRS DISCUSSION, students will be able to use academic behaviors and practice discourse of scholarship to discuss and define ASSIMILATION, ACCULTURATION, and RESISTANCE and evaluate the importance of each term to the study of cultural identity.

HandoutsPhilsophical Chairs, (Handout)

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Wednesday 9.17: SOCRATIC SEMINAR PREP DAY

UNIT GOAL: Define identity terms as they apply to Mexican American literature and evaluate basic issues and themes.

Objective: After annotating Noah Remnick’s article “Why Ethnic Studies is Good for California, and America?” students will be able to practice academic behaviors to discuss the value of Ethnic Studies in a Socratic Seminar.

Handouts: Socratic Seminar Evaluation Guide, Questioning Guide

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Thursday 9.18: SOCRATIC SEMINAR DAY

UNIT GOAL: Define identity terms as they apply to Mexican American literature and evaluate basic issues and themes.

Objective: After annotating Noah Remnick’s article “Why Ethnic Studies is Good for California, and America?” students will be able to practice academic behaviors to discuss the value of Ethnic Studies in a Socratic Seminar.

Handouts: Socratic Seminar Evaluation Guide, Questioning Guide

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Friday 9.19: Guest Speaker, Dr. Paul Apodaca

UNIT GOAL: Define identity terms as they apply to Mexican American literature and evaluate basic issues and themes.

Objective: After completing notes on Dr. Paul Apodaca’s lecture on oral narratives and indigenous cultures, students will be able to define and evaluate the importance of cultural literacy by completing an analytical summary. 

Handouts: Analytical Summary

Homework: Notebook due on TODAY! Rubric

English 3P Honors 9.15-9.19 Weekly Update

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportunity to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes, what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE means maybe, if time allows, perhaps.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

Monday 9.15: Progress Check

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: Students will provide evidence of objective mastery by completing a progress check that 1) defines the concept of America and American identity 2.) Describes the effects of European settlement on American Indian populations 3.) Compares Puritan and Rationalist views on God, Human Nature, and Government. 

Handouts: N/A

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Tuesday 9.16:Mastery Assessment

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: Students will self assess objective mastery by completing a progress check that 1) defines the concept of America and American identity 2.) Describes the effects of European settlement on American Indian populations 3.) Compares Puritan and Rationalist views on God, Human Nature, and Government. 

Handouts: N/A

Homework: Read Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” , Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Wednesday 9.17: Human Nature

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Handouts: a. from Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes b. from Discourse on Inequality by Jean Jacques Rousseau c. Human Nature Socratic Seminar

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Thursday 9.18: Socratic Seminar

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Handouts: a. from Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes b. from Discourse on Inequality by Jean Jacques Rousseau d. Questioning Guide e. Socratic Seminar Evaluation Guide

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Friday 9.19: Introduction to First Literatures

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.


Objective: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Handouts: a. PREREADING: Native Voices Video b. READING: from “Coyote Finishes His Work” p. 25 & The Big Myth c. POST READING: Summary Template

Homework: Notebook due on TODAY! Rubric

English 3P 9.15- 9.19 Weekly Updates

WARNING:  This is a tentative calendar for the week.  I post this to provide my students with an opportuinty to preview the week and to help them plan accordingly.  Sometimes things go exactly as planned and it is amazing. Sometimes they don’t because we might finish an objective faster than anticipated.  Sometimes what I believed would take ten minutes at the beginning of class ends up taking an entire class.  Sometimes there are some mornings when I get ideas and decide to change EVERYTHING because something else seems better.  Anyways, you get the picture: TENTATIVE.  As my grandmother used to say, “we make plans and the universe laughs”.

Monday 9.15: Progress Check

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: Students will provide evidence of objective mastery by completing a progress check that 1) defines the concept of America and American identity 2.) Describes the effects of European settlement on American Indian populations 3.) Compares Puritan and Rationalist views on God, Human Nature, and Government. 

Handouts: N/A

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Tuesday 9.16: Encounters and Foundations

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: Students will self assess objective mastery by completing a progress check that 1) defines the concept of America and American identity 2.) Describes the effects of European settlement on American Indian populations 3.) Compares Puritan and Rationalist views on God, Human Nature, and Government. 

Handouts: N/A

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Wednesday 9.17: Human Nature Pt. 1

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Handouts: a. from Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes b. from Discourse on Inequality by Jean Jacques Rousseau

Homework:Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Thursday 9.18: Human Nature Pt. 2

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Handouts: a. from Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes b. from Discourse on Inequality by Jean Jacques Rousseau

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric

Friday 9.19: Human Nature Socratic Seminar

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

Objective: After annotating passages from Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Handouts: a. from Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes b. from Discourse on Inequality by Jean Jacques Rousseau

Homework: Notebook due on FRIDAY! Rubric