English 3P: Weekly Updates 9.21-9.28

EdwardsPreachMONDAY:  Jonathan Edwards Progress Check

OBJECTIVE: By completing a progress check students will provide evidence of their ability to 1.) identify authors’ purpose and use of imagery, figurative language, and rhetorical devices to support claim 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Puritan Writers view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”, use imagery and figurative language to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

HANDOUTS: N/A

TUESDAY:  Jonathan Edwards Progress Check Peer Revision

OBJECTIVE: By evaluating a progress check students will provide evidence of their ability to 1.) identify authors’ purpose and use of imagery, figurative language, and rhetorical devices to support claim 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Puritan Writers view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”, use imagery and figurative language to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

HANDOUTS: Learning Scale, Peer Revision Powerpoint

WEDNESDAY:  Introduction to Olaudah Equiano (Late Start)

OBJECTIVE: By reading and annotating Olaudah Equiano’s “The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano”, students will be able to: 1.) identify authors’ purpose , claim and use of imagery 2.) explain how these early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did author’s of slave narratives such as Olaudah Equiano view HUMAN NATURE? How did slave narratives such as “The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano”, use imagery and the Aristotelian Triangle to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

HANDOUTS:  Olaudah Equiano Notes & Tone Words

 

imagesTHURSDAY:  The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano

OBJECTIVE: By reading and annotating Olaudah Equiano’s “The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano”, students will be able to: 1.) identify authors’ purpose , claim and use of imagery 2.) explain how these early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did author’s of slave narratives such as Olaudah Equiano view HUMAN NATURE? How did slave narratives such as “The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano”, use imagery and the Aristotelian Triangle to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

HANDOUTS:  The Interesting Life of Olaudah EquianoOlaudah Equiano Notes & Tone Words

FRIDAY:  The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano Close Reading

OBJECTIVE: By reading and annotating Olaudah Equiano’s “The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano”, students will be able to: 1.) identify authors’ purpose , claim and use of imagery 2.) explain how these early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did author’s of slave narratives such as Olaudah Equiano view HUMAN NATURE? How did slave narratives such as “The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano”, use imagery and the Aristotelian Triangle to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

HANDOUTS:   The Interesting Life of Olaudah Equiano, Dialectical Journal Summary Template

HOMEWORKINTERACTIVE NOTEBOOK RUBRIC

English 3P Honors Weekly Updates: 9.28-10.2

MONDAY:  Puritan Writing Progress Check Peer Review

OBJECTIVE: By completing a progress check students will provide evidence of their ability to 1.) identify authors’ purpose and use of imagery, figurative language, and rhetorical devices to support claim 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Puritan Writers view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” and poetry by Anne Bradstreet, use imagery to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

Notes & Handouts: Progress Check Revision Guide, Foundations Learning Scale

HOMEWORK:  Define Archetype & annotate essay by Joseph Bruchac Essay on Native American Oral Traditions based on question:  What is the purpose and central claim or his essay?  What evidence does he use to defend it?

TUESDAY: Introduction to Oral Narratives

OBJECTIVE: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” by analyzing ARCHETYPES and completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

Notes & Handouts: Native Voices Video Joseph Bruchac Essay

HOMEWORK: Find definition of Archetype, and identify the character traits of trickster archetype, Read & Annotate “Coyote Finishes his Work” and identify the character traits of Coyote or “Trickster” archetype

WEDNESDAY: ARCHETYPES in Native American Oral Narratives

OBJECTIVE: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” by analyzing ARCHETYPES and completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How did Native American traditions view HUMAN NATURE? How did Oral Narratives such as “The Sky Tree” and “Coyote Finishes his Work”, use imagery and ARCHETYPES to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

Notes & Handouts: Read and Annotate Joseph Bruchac Essay

HOMEWORK: Find definition of Archetype, and identify the character traits of trickster archetype, Read & Annotate “Coyote Finishes his Work” and identify the character traits of Coyote or “Trickster” archetype

THURSDAY:  ARCHETYPES in Native American Oral Narratives

OBJECTIVE: After annotating passages from creation stories of the Americas, students will be able to identify native views of “human nature” by analyzing ARCHETYPES and completing summaries that include events used to develop moral lesson in the story.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How did Native American traditions view HUMAN NATURE? How did Oral Narratives such as “The Sky Tree” and “Coyote Finishes his Work”, use imagery and ARCHETYPES to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

Notes & Handouts: Introduction to Native Stories Notes Joseph Bruchac Essay, Write Summarizing Paragraph, Read and Annotate “The Sky Tree” p. 24

HOMEWORK: Find definition of Archetype, and identify the character traits of trickster archetype, Read & Annotate “Coyote Finishes his Work” and identify the character traits of Coyote or “Trickster” archetype

FRIDAY:  Native American Oral Narratives

OBJECTIVE: By completing a progress check students will provide evidence of their ability to 1.) identify authors’ purpose and use of imagery, figurative language, and ARCHETYPE to support claim 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How did Native American traditions view HUMAN NATURE? How did Oral Narratives such as “The Sky Tree” and “Coyote Finishes his Work”, use imagery and ARCHETYPES to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

Notes & Handouts: Oral Narratives“The Sky Tree” p. 24

HOMEWORK: INTERACTIVE NOTEBOOK RUBRIC DUE TODAY, Find definition of Archetype, and identify the character traits of trickster archetype, Read & Annotate “Coyote Finishes his Work” and identify the character traits of Coyote or “Trickster” archetype

English 3P Honors: Weekly Updates 9.21-9.25

Monday: Human Nature Socratic Seminar

OBJECTIVE: After annotating passages from Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “Discourse on Inequality” students will be able discuss and evaluate Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Essential Question:  What is human nature and how does our view of this philosophical concept influence our socio-political systems?

Handouts & NotesSocratic Seminar Outer Circle

Web Resources for Jonathan Edwards

Tuesday:  Introduction to Puritan Texts Jonathan Edwards 

OBJECTIVE: By writing a reflection on fear and motivation, and compelting Cornell Notes on Jonathan Edwards, students will be able to: 1.) use background knowledge to predict authors’purpose and use of rhetorical devices 2.) explain how these early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Puritan Writers view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” and poetry by Anne Bradstreet, use imagery to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

Handouts & Notes:  Socratic Seminar Reflection, Edwards Notes, & Tone Words 

Homework:  Read, Annotate, and Summarize Anne Bradstreet’s Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666.

Wednesday: Tone and Imagery “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” Close Reading

OBJECTIVE: By reading and annotating for imagery and tone in Jonathan Edwards’ sermon “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”, students will be able to: 1.) identify authors’ purpose and use of rhetorical devices 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Puritan Writers view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” and poetry by Anne Bradstreet, use imagery to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

Handouts & Notes: “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards, pp. 44-49,

Homework: Read, Annotate, and Summarize Anne Bradstreet’s Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666.

Thursday : Imagery and the Aristotelian Triangle in Edwards’ “Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God” 

OBJECTIVE: By completing a DIALECTICAL JOURNAL that identifies Edwards’ use of imagery and figurative language, students will be able to 1.) identify authors’purpose and use of rhetorical devices to support claim 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Puritan Writers view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” and poetry by Anne Bradstreet, use imagery to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

Handouts & NotesDialectical Journal

HOMEWORK: Read, Annotate, and Summarize Anne Bradstreet’s Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666.

FRIDAY:  Puritan Writing Progress Check

OBJECTIVE: By completing a progress check students will provide evidence of their ability to 1.) identify authors’purpose and use of imagery, figurative language, and rhetorical devices to support claim 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Puritan Writers view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” and poetry by Anne Bradstreet, use imagery to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity?

HOMEWORK:  Define Archetype & annotate essay by Joseph Bruchac Essay on Native American Oral Traditions based on question:  What is the purpose and central claim or his essay?  What evidence does he use to defend it?

Creative Writing 9.21-9.25

Monday: I am a camera

Objective: After reading Christopher Isherwood’s “Goodbye Berlin” students will notice and render vivid details to describe a scene without trying to explain or interpret it as material for Creative Nonfiction piece.

Handouts: Creative NonFiction Exercises A-C, Writer’s Confession by Junot Diaz, I am a camera

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Tuesday: Things I was Taught/ Things I Wasn’t Taught

Objective: To elicit fresh and surprising insights into your relationship to family, friends, community, and the world.

Handouts: Ian McEwan’s Advice for Aspiring Writers, Mentor Text from Dark, Student Sample

Wednesday: I Want to Know Why

Objective: Identify interesting gaps in your understanding or knowledge in order to generate raw material for short stories.

Handouts: How to tell if you’re a writer, John Iriving, Student Sample

Thursday: Where I’m From

Objective:  Identify important characters from inner circle of friends and background characters that reveal a sense of place.

Handouts: Cisneros on Search for Place and Fiction, Mentor text, Student Samples

Friday:  Writers’ Workshop

 

English 3P Weekly Updates: 9.21-9.25

Philosophy-Header1Monday: Human Nature Socratic Seminar Preparation

OBJECTIVE: After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able to compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” and prepare questions for a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Essential Question:  What is human nature and how does our view of this philosophical concept influence our socio-political systems?

Handouts & Notes: Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep,

Tuesday: Human Nature Socratic Seminar

OBJECTIVE: After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able discuss and evaluate Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

Essential Question:  What is human nature and how does our view of this philosophical concept influence our socio-political systems?

Handouts & NotesSocratic Seminar Outer Circle

Web Resources for Jonathan Edwards
Web Resources for Jonathan Edwards

Wednesday:  Introduction to Jonathan Edwards

OBJECTIVE: By writing a reflection on fear and motivation, and compelting Cornell Notes on Jonathan Edwards, students will be able to: 1.) use background knowledge to predict authors’purpose and use of rhetorical devices 2.) explain how these early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Jonathan Edwards view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” use imagery to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity? 

Handouts & Notes:  Edwards Notes, & Tone Words

Thursday: Tone and Imagery “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” Close Reading

OBJECTIVE: By reading and annotating for imagery and tone in Jonathan Edwards’ sermon “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”, students will be able to: 1.) identify authors’ purpose and use of rhetorical devices 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Jonathan Edwards view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” use imagery to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity? 

Handouts & Notes: “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” by Jonathan Edwards, pp. 44-49

Friday: Imagery and the Aristotelian Triangle in Edwards’ “Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God” 

OBJECTIVE: By completing a DIALECTICAL JOURNAL that identifies Edwards’ use of imagery and figurative language, students will be able to 1.) identify authors’purpose and use of rhetorical devices to support claim 2.) explain how this early writers’ views of human nature  influenced American identity and political thought.

Essential Question:  How did Jonathan Edwards view HUMAN NATURE? How did SERMONS such as “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” use imagery to clearly communicate their message about human nature? How did his views influence the United States of America as a political and cultural entity? 

Handouts & NotesDialectical Journal

Homework: Summarize by completing Summary Template to prepare for Progress Check on Monday!

Creative Writing Weekly Updates: 9.14-9.18

Monday: Critical Feedback v. Criticism

UNIT GOAL: Students will write a piece of Creative Nonfiction.

Objective: Students will learn Lerman Method for Critical Feedback and apply it to evaluate peer’s work.

Handouts: Lerman Method for Critical Feedback

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Tuesday: The Zen of Writing

UNIT GOAL: Students will write a piece of Creative Nonfiction. 

Objective: Students will read and respond to the Preface of Ray Brandbury’s The Zen of Writing, and will revise “Choose Your Own Adventure” using peer feedback.

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Wednesday: I don’t know why I remember

UNIT GOAL: Students will write a piece of Creative Nonfiction.

Objective: By responding to “I don’t know why I remember” prompt student will be able to pinpoint previously unexplored material that remains charged in some important emotional way as material for Creative Nonfiction piece.

Handouts: Student Sample, Mentor Text from from East of Eden

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Thursday: I am a camera

Objective: After reading Christopher Isherwood’s “Goodbye Berlin” students will notice and render vivid details to describe a scene without trying to explain or interpret it as material for Creative Nonfiction piece.

Handouts: Mentor Text from “Goodbye Berlin” by Christopher Isherwood, Student Sample

Announcements/Upcoming: Collaboration day on Wednesday, Creative Writing Field Trip to see Vietgone by Qui Nguyen at South Coast Repertory on October 17 @ 7:00 p.m.

Friday: Writing Workshop

 

 

English 3P Honors: Weekly Updates for 9.14-9.18

Monday: What is America & American Identity?

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

ObjectiveStudents will discuss and define concept of AMERICA and AMERICAN IDENTITY by participating in concept attainment activity and FOUR SQUARE discussion.  

Handouts: INTERACTIVE NOTEBOOK RUBRIC, Introduction to Encounters and Foundations

HOMEWORK: One Pager For Summer Reading DUE FRIDAY

Tuesday & Wednesday: Historical Context of Early American Literature & Culture

Objective: After participating in a GALLERY WALK, students will be able to explain the effects of European settlements on native populations and compare Rationalist and Puritan views of human nature, God, and government by completing a Gallery Walk Pamphlet.

a. Gallery Walk Images and Text

b. Gallery Walk Pamphlet

c. Web Resource: http://www.ushistory.org/us/index.asp

HOMEWORK: Hobbes and Rousseau on Human NatureOne Pager For Summer Reading DUE FRIDAY,

Philosophy-Header1

Thursday : Human Nature Socratic Seminar Preparation

Due: Annotations and Questions for Hobbes and Rousseau

Objective: After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature”  to those expressed by John Steinbeck’s East of Eden in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

c. Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep, and Socratic Seminar Outer Circle

Friday: Human Nature Socratic Seminar

HOMEWORK: One Pager For Summer Reading DUE FRIDAY

After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

c. Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep, and Socratic Seminar Outer Circle

English 3P Weekly Updates: 9.14-18

Art-Painting-American-Flag-Wallpaper-HDMonday: What is America & American Identity?

Unit Goal: In a TIMED WRITE ESSAY, SWBAT describe how Early American texts and genres explored and communicated views of human nature through the use of the rhetorical triangle, imagery, and figurative language.

ObjectiveStudents will discuss and define concept of AMERICA and AMERICAN IDENTITY by participating in concept attainment activity and FOUR SQUARE discussion.  

Handouts: INTERACTIVE NOTEBOOK RUBRIC, Introduction to Encounters and Foundations

Tuesday: Historical Context of Early American Literature & Culture

After participating in a GALLERY WALK, students will be able to explain the effects of European settlements on native populations and compare Rationalist and Puritan views of human nature, God, and government by completing a Gallery Walk Pamphlet.

a. Gallery Walk Images and Text

b. Gallery Walk Pamphlet

c. Web Resource: http://www.ushistory.org/us/index.asp

Philosophy-Header1Wednesday: Introduction to Human Nature

After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

a. from Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes

b. from Discourse on Inequality by Jean Jacques Rousseau

Thursday : Human Nature Socratic Seminar Preparation

After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

c. Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep, and Socratic Seminar Outer Circle

Friday: Human Nature Socratic Seminar

After annotating passages from Thomas HobbesLeviathan and from Jean Jacques Rousseau’sDiscourse on Inequality” students will be able compare and contrast Thomas Hobbes and Jean Jacques Rousseau’s “state of nature” in a Socratic Seminar to understand European influence of Early American literature.  

c. Socratic Seminar Instructions, Questions Guide, Socratic Seminar Prep, and Socratic Seminar Outer Circle

Creative Writing Community Guidelines: Compiled by 4th period

communityofwritersToday, we began the process of establishing a safe environment that promotes creativity, collegiality, and risk.

BY ANSWERING THE ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What kind of social classroom conditions promote creativity? How do we as a community of artists eliminate obstacles to writing creatively?

As a community of artists, writers, daydreamers, risk takers, CREATORS we know that we shall:

Be confident

as we make mistakes

Amplify ideas

that are honest &

supportive,

friendly

amusing

& encouraging.

We shall keep calm.

Help someone if asked,

with constructive criticism

through feedback that is

respectful & original

because we pay attention

to inspire &

motivate others to start

engaging in conversations for ideas

compliment and be kind to people’s work

Make eye contact

share random ideas.

Say random ideas,

write random ideas,

So be yourself

be open minded

and most of all communicate.

 

In order to do this we won’t

Fight, be shy, dishonest

or insult.

We won’t be obnoxious,

ignore,

or critique negatively through disrespect

that makes fun of people’s work.

If feeling nervous or insecure, we won’t hide it

by disturbing others,

yelling across the room,

lying about work,

stealing ideas,

acting rude,

lazy,

judgemental,

negative,

make fun of others,

mock,

acting bored,

gossiping or have side conversations.

 

We will not laugh at someone’s work unless its supposed to provoke that

because we don’t mess with someone’s work

 

So don’t be afraid to say what you think.

 

 

Creative Writing Weekly Updates: 9.8-9.11

TUESDAY 9.8: Orientation

Unit Goal: N/A

Objective: By the end of the period SWBAT describe and follow classroom guidelines and procedures and will understand grading scales and procedures.

HandoutsOrientation Prezi, FALL 2015 SYLLABUS

WEDNESDAY 9.9: Choose your own adventure

Unit Goal: At the end of the Creative Non-Fiction Unit, students will create a portfolio which shows student’s ability to use point of view, establish voice, and apply characterization in original writing.

Objective: After completing Choose your own adventure” writing exercise, students will be able to write a story that includes a distinct point of view, clear voice, and detailed imagery to convey characterization.

Handouts: Notes

THURSDAY 9.10: Writing Workshop 101

Unit Goal: At the end of the Creative Non-Fiction Unit, students will create a portfolio which shows student’s ability to use point of view, establish voice, and apply characterization in original writing.

Objective: After reading from Sherman Alexie’s “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fist-Fight in Heaven,” students will be able to apply the Lerman Method to discuss the author’s point of view, voice, and use of imagery and practice writer’s workshop etiquette and procedures.

Handouts: Lerman Method, “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fist-Fight in Heaven”

FRIDAY 9.11:  Establishing Mood and Setting through Vivid Imagery

Unit Goal: At the end of the Creative Non-Fiction Unit, students will create a portfolio which shows student’s ability to use point of view, establish voice, and apply characterization in original writing.

Objective: By completing “I don’t Know Why I Remember…” writing exercise, students will be able to pinpoint and describe using vivid imagery previously unexplored that remains important in some emotional way.

Handouts: Notes, from “I remember” from East of Eden by John Steinbeck